Category Archives: Study Tips

Study Tips: Academic Checklist

Setting the tone for the semester

by Texas State SLAC

Photo by CollegeDegrees360 / flickr.com

Photo by CollegeDegrees360 / flickr.com

This is the first full week of school and a good time to set the tone for what lies ahead this semester. Consider this checklist to help you out:

____    I have purchased books and other materials for all my classes.

____    I have attended all classes for the first time and collected a syllabus for each one.

____    I have a daily planner and wall calendar on which to post all events, assignments and their due dates, exams/quizzes, trips and other extracurricular activities.

____    I have allocated time for reading each day during prime hours (8 a.m. to 5 p.m., M-F).

____    I have a study schedule. If I do not have one, I will get someone to help me make one. A good place to start looking for help is at SLAC.

____    I have arranged with my employer to give me the same work schedule each week if at all possible. This will allow me to set my study hours — and not be worried about having to go to work at unexpected times and days.

____    I have shared my study schedule with my roommate so we can coordinate activities around the time we have set aside for studying.

____    I promise myself that I will read to get ahead when I don’t have homework; moreover, I promise myself that I will never go to class having NOT read the assigned reading.

____    I will attend all labs that my courses require.

____    I promise to give myself some time to relax and have fun — and to take care of my physical and mental health. The Student Health Center and Counseling Center are on campus to assist me.

____    I will post this contract with myself where I can see it every day.

Signed: _________________________________

Date:    _________________________________

Study Tips: Reading Comprehension

Succeed In College: Read To Understand

By SLAC

Try not to be overwhelmed by setting a reading schedule, Bobcats!

Try not to be overwhelmed by setting a reading schedule, Bobcats!

Love it or hate it, you have to get familiar with academic reading in college. Your exams may include questions about readings that professors assigned but never discussed in class, so learn to read to understand. The more active your reading, the better your chance for thorough comprehension. Use a structured reading method involving forethoughtperformance, and reflection.

Continue reading

Study Tips: Summer Session 2

Time: Friend or Foe?

by SLAC

It’s 1:30 a.m.: you’re at your desk, a can of Monster precariously perched on the shortest stack of books and articles, with 456 words or 19 more algebra problems to go. Our advice? Go to bed, whether that’s a mattress, bunk or futon, and sleep. At this point, you are falling victim to the commonly held idea that you “work better under pressure.” In the summer, what this really means is only Now or Neverthat you are working under pressure because you no longer have an option to do otherwise. Working too close to deadlines also means not having a chance to problem solve if something goes wrong or if you have last-minute trouble with a concept. Besides, even if you do perform best late at night during the long semesters, summer classes are held every day ― days when you used to be sleeping after pulling an all-nighter.

 

The fact is that time in summer school is unrelenting. Use the self-discipline you dredge up to take care of your body, to make yourself read or study earlier in the day, to start preparing for midterms and finals and to e-mail or talk with your professor about tests and papers ― including the invisible professors in your online courses. Do it now. Check TRACS and Bobcat Mail each day, and sometimes several times a day. In summer school, falling behind in sleep, your studies or your communications is even more destructive than during fall or spring. It’s time to make time your friend.

Study Tips: Summer Session Survival

The Upside of Summer Session

by SLAC

Check out SLAC for tutoring in a wide variety of subjects.

Check out SLAC for tutoring in a wide variety of subjects.

Ah, summer school! Parking is closer and traffic is lighter. You can turn left without a car bearing down on you or a bicyclist whizzing past. The river and its banks are less crowded. You can park on Town Square! You can walk on campus without dodging skateboards. Classrooms seem bigger. You don’t trip over backpacks as you squeeze between desks, and if professors don’t mind, you can prop up your flip-flops.

There’s only one problem: If you don’t get textbooks and syllabi early so that you can read any material your instructors might have assigned for the first day, you could saunter into a lecture unprepared. When possible, get your first week of reading done before classes even begin. Expect papers each week (or two), tests on Mondays, and homework every night, because you have only four and a half weeks to cover 13–14 weeks of course material.

But intensity has its benefits. You’ll be working with focused students broader in age range and experiences; some will be returning professionals honing skills or redirecting careers. As a result, in-class discussion can be more interesting and study groups can draw from the variety of students’ experiences, so use each other’s strengths. Also, motivated students in small classes can make your professors even more involved and accessible.

Of course, campus study and recreation resources are still available: The Student Learning Assistance Center (SLAC), the Writing Center, Math Lab and many other tutoring labs will be open during the summer sessions. In addition, the Alkek Library, LBJ Student Student Center and Rec Center are not only open, but they probably are far less crowded than during the fall and spring semesters.

Summer school equals work but it’s also a great introduction or a refreshing return to one of college’s best experiences!

 

Around Campus: Summer Resources

Summer school survival tips

by Brittnie Curtis

Summer school has begun and campus is filled with Bobcats again. If you’re one of those students hiking around campus, you might want to know some of the resources available to you this summer.

Summer sessions are a great way to get on the fast track to graduation.

Summer sessions are a great way to get on the fast track to graduation.

Transportation Services – Twitter and Facebook
Bobcat Shuttle. Shuttle hours are different in the summer. The system is in operation during all class days. Monday – Friday service runs between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. for most shuttle routes on class days and during final exams. On the Bobcat Shuttle page, you can find the summer schedule, mapsalternative transportation and much more. Continue reading

Study Tips: Food for Thought

Good food for studying

by SLAC

Steer clear of the junk food aisle when you're choosing your studying snacks.

Steer clear of the junk food aisle when you’re choosing your studying snacks. [photo by gruntzooki / flickr.com]

Does your all-night studying include all-night snacking? Do you keep your brain and body going by working your way through packages of Oreos, bags of hot Cheetos, Dr. Peppers, Red Bulls, and a thick crust pepperoni pizza . . . one chapter at a time? Do you overeat to cope with the stress of last-minute studying?

Filling up with junk food can actually sabotage your efforts to prepare for final exams. Continue reading

Study Tips: Making the Most of Spring Break

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A relaxing new environment can be a great place to study.

Leave a little room for textbooks in your suitcase

by SLAC

Spring break is here at last. Unfortunately, semesters don’t always end when a college student’s vacation begins. Learning to manage working while enjoying your time off is an essential skill for college life and beyond!

First: Make a plan. Since your brain is still in college mode, take advantage of it. Just as you do in the regular semester, put what you have to get done and related deadlines on a calendar and make a schedule to be sure you study some each day and more on days you aren’t actively involved in extracurricular fun. Making a plan now will prevent stress later and keep you from completely losing the rhythm of academic life.

Tell your family, friends and roommates that you have some work to do over the break. Letting people know in advance that you must do some homework over the break will make it easier for you to get it done. This way you won’t have to deal with others’ disappointment when you can’t do everything they’d planned with them. Also, they’re more likely to help by reminding you of your plans and giving you space and time to stick to them.

Keep up on your sleep and nutrition, and avoid ill people if possible. You don’t want to have to make up for losing a week of classes after coming back from a week off and get that much further from your college work and world.

Use the city library if you need a quiet place. Working at home, or wherever you’re spending break, may be difficult. Don’t forget that city libraries are almost everywhere (including tropical Spring Break getaways). They can be great places to work for a few hours in peace.

Use time waiting in airports, on long car rides or during bad weather days to study. Even intermittent studying will help your retention and processing and make returning to academic life easier. Use earplugs to block noise, or if you feel like you might need a disguise to avoid being forced to converse, wear earbuds and take an iPod and pretend it’s on when studying in a public place.

Just as important as studying regularly and using downtime to work is making back-up copies of your materials. Carrying notes and computers opens the possibility that they may get lost or damaged. Make back-up travel drives, e-mail work, photocopy or scan in notes, and, as always, save your work in at least two places.

Finally, if this is an appropriate time in your academic career to gain real-world experience, consider alternate Spring Break trips that focus on volunteer work for well-known organizations. These may include local entities such as Habitat for Humanity or domestic violence shelters. Some trips could involve living on and working at a camp for the disabled, a Native American reservation, a nature reserve, or going out of the country. Regardless of where you go, volunteer work can broaden your perspective and shape your goals.

Have a great break, Cats!

Sources:

Kelci Lynn Lucier

http://collegelife.about.com/od/academiclife/a/breakhomework.htm

Susan Fitzgerald, MA and J. Lee Peters, EdD

http://www.netplaces.com/college-survival/winter-and-spring-breaks/why-study-during-break.htm

http://www.netplaces.com/college-survival/winter-and-spring-breaks/alternate-spring-break-experiences.htm

http://www.varsitytutors.com/blog/best+study+tips+for+spring+break