Category Archives: Uncategorized

Study Tips: “Google Map” Essay Tests

Map your way to
successful essay writing

by SLAC

When you read an essay question, do you get a headache? Does your brain go blank? Try comparing taking essay tests to using Google Maps or another map search engine. Principles that achieve good map search results also work for answering essay questions.

1. GET DIRECTIONS
Read the question thoroughly. Details determine the route you take in your explanation.

Search tip: Identify specifics in an essay question so you don’t waste time on false starts and explanations that are loose or dead ends.

 2. ASSESS THE MOST EFFICIENT ROUTE
Make an outline of relevant information to make clear connections, organized by main and subordinate ideas.

Search tip: Link relevant ideas into a navigable whole. If links or chains of reasoning are random or chaotic, your answer could miss the mark.

3. PLAN YOUR ROUTE
Visualize action words to find your lines of arguments:

  • ANALYZE – provide an in-depth exploration of a topic, considering components of ideas and their interrelationships
  • EXPLAIN – clarify, interpret, give reasons for differences of opinion or of results; analyze causes
  • ILLUSTRATE – justify your position or answer a question using concrete examples
  • TRACE – describe the evolution, development or progress of the subject step-by-step, sometimes using chronological order
  • COMPARE/CONTRAST – emphasize similarities and/or differences between two topics; give reasons pro and con
  • PROVE – argue the truth of a statement by giving factual evidence and logical reasoning
  • CRITICIZE – express your judgment about the merit, truth or usefulness of the views or factors mentioned in the question and support your judgment with facts and explanations
  • EVALUATE – appraise, give your viewpoint, cite limitations and advantages, include the opinion of authorities and give evidence to support your position
  • INTERPRET – translate, give examples or comment on a subject, usually including your own viewpoint
  • REVIEW – examine and respond to possible problems or obstacles in your account

Search tip: Use the essay question as your guide to choose the line(s) of argument that allows you to make your strongest, most concise argument. Then, map your answer!

4. PRINT OUT YOUR MAP
If your professor allows, take in an outline or more than one outline of essay questions, but be SURE this is okay before you do this. If you can’t take in an outline, go in with one (or more) in your mind and write it inside of your bluebook or on your paper first thing. This helps when you can’t remember something because of stress. It also helps you stay calm and focused during tests.

You’ve got this, Bobcats! For more great study tips, visit SLAC online.

Keeping Up With Academic Goals

by SLAC

Woman studying in library

Planners are great ways to keep you up-to-date and organized.

September is practically gone, but it’s never too late to remind yourself that school work now is crucial — especially considering extracurricular activities you may have committed to this fall. Make sure to keep up with all of the reading(s) and homework for classes. The longer you put them off, the harder it is to catch up, and the more likely you will become overwhelmed the night before a test or due date. Bad grades at the beginning of a course are very hard to bring up at the end.

Here are three tips to help you keep going:

  1. If you have any large papers or projects, spread the work evenly throughout the rest of the semester. Do not wait until the last minute. If the project or paper seems overwhelming, break it into parts and set deadlines for each.
  1. Refresh your connections to contacts in class. If you get sick and have to miss class, having people to get notes from will help you catch up.
  1. Finally, study groups offer one of the best ways to prepare for tests, whether you are doing well in a class or not. Learning from a peer can be easier than trying to increase your understanding alone. And helping others learn is the best way to retain and understand material yourself!

Whatever your strategies, don’t let other fall obligations lull you into inaction. That way finishing on a positive note won’t seem impossible later!

Study Tips: Fall 2014

Tips for Planning Your Semester

by SLAC

Student studying in library with laptop

A few hours spent in the library each week can do wonders!

There’s so much pressure in getting an education: parents wanting the best for you, employers looking for top-of-the-line students, and you expecting excellence from yourself and success for your future. It’s okay to want to make parents proud, find a good job and be successful, but the grades that allow these things depend to a large extent on how you plan. The following are some tips on planning your semester: Continue reading

Around Campus: Student Involvement

Get Involved, Bobcats!

by Brittnie Curtis with SLAC

Student Involvement Fair

135 organizations were represented at the Student Involvement Fair!

The third week of classes has come to an end and students are starting to settle into campus life. With so much going on the first few weeks, joining campus organizations can sometimes be pushed to the side. The Student Involvement Fair reminded us about all the great organizations Texas State has to offer.

Student Involvement, located in the LBJ Student Center, hosted the Student Involvement Fair that was held this past Wednesday. The fair lasted four hours and spread across campus — from the LBJSC Ballroom to the mall area outside of LBJSC and along the full length of the Quad. It was great seeing so many organizations represented all at once. There were so many to choose from and all of them had friendly faces and welcoming arms. Continue reading

Study Tips: Academic Checklist

Setting the tone for the semester

by Texas State SLAC

Photo by CollegeDegrees360 / flickr.com

Photo by CollegeDegrees360 / flickr.com

This is the first full week of school and a good time to set the tone for what lies ahead this semester. Consider this checklist to help you out:

____    I have purchased books and other materials for all my classes.

____    I have attended all classes for the first time and collected a syllabus for each one.

____    I have a daily planner and wall calendar on which to post all events, assignments and their due dates, exams/quizzes, trips and other extracurricular activities.

____    I have allocated time for reading each day during prime hours (8 a.m. to 5 p.m., M-F).

____    I have a study schedule. If I do not have one, I will get someone to help me make one. A good place to start looking for help is at SLAC.

____    I have arranged with my employer to give me the same work schedule each week if at all possible. This will allow me to set my study hours — and not be worried about having to go to work at unexpected times and days.

____    I have shared my study schedule with my roommate so we can coordinate activities around the time we have set aside for studying.

____    I promise myself that I will read to get ahead when I don’t have homework; moreover, I promise myself that I will never go to class having NOT read the assigned reading.

____    I will attend all labs that my courses require.

____    I promise to give myself some time to relax and have fun — and to take care of my physical and mental health. The Student Health Center and Counseling Center are on campus to assist me.

____    I will post this contract with myself where I can see it every day.

Signed: _________________________________

Date:    _________________________________

Message from the Student Body President

Welcome, Class of 2018!

by Tiffany Young, Student Body President

_C9A1277You are now in Bobcat Country! This is a community filled with friendly and diverse students. As you already know, ours is a lovely campus that provides many beautiful backdrops, plus activities for so many of your future memories.

A great way to start your time here at Texas State is to get involved. It is important to find your niche on this campus. We have great organizations that provide endless opportunities. Continue reading

Exploring Majors: Clinical Laboratory Science

What’s it like to be a Clinical Laboratory Science major?
Lindsey Coulter tells us.

By Brittnie Curtis

There are so many degrees to choose from at Texas State, some of which you may never have heard of before. If you’d like to learn more about what a clinical laboratory scientist does, watch this cool video.

Q. Your degree in Clinical Laboratory Science isn’t your first. What other degrees have you earned

Lindsey has earned three degrees at Texas State.        "It’s all about motivation. You have to be motivated; if you’re not interested, you won’t do it."

Lindsey has earned three degrees at Texas State. “It’s all about motivation. You have to be motivated; if you’re not interested, you won’t do it.”

A.  I got my bachelor’s in microbiology and then I immediately started the master’s program in biology (specifically micro-research). Immediately after that, I started the Clinical Lab Science (CLS) program. I’ve earned all of my degrees from Texas State.

Q. Why did you get all your degrees at Texas State?
A. The professors are helpful. I can walk into my professor’s office anytime and talk with them. It’s a very friendly environment, and at CLS it’s kind of like a family. We have about 20 people a year and there are five professors, so you really get to know each other. Continue reading