Tag Archives: education

Study Tips: Fall 2014

Tips for Planning Your Semester

by SLAC

Student studying in library with laptop

A few hours spent in the library each week can do wonders!

There’s so much pressure in getting an education: parents wanting the best for you, employers looking for top-of-the-line students, and you expecting excellence from yourself and success for your future. It’s okay to want to make parents proud, find a good job and be successful, but the grades that allow these things depend to a large extent on how you plan. The following are some tips on planning your semester: Continue reading

Bobcat Faces: Haydyn Jackson

December grad creatively merges diverse fields of studies

By Mindy Green

Photo of Haydyn Jackson

Jackson’s artwork is inspired by the study of culture and human interaction.

When Haydyn Jackson first enrolled at Texas State, she declared art and design as her major. As she started getting into her upper-level classes, however, she decided to pursue a different field. Jackson found herself drawn to anthropology, and eventually she switched her major. “The idea of studying culture and the way people interact and socialize seems really important,” Jackson says.

After switching majors, art was no longer Jackson’s primary focus. Her professors, however, encouraged her to continue to develop her artistic talents. She credits Ashe Laughlin, senior lecturer in the School of Art and Design for helping her decide to keep art as a minor. “He wouldn’t let me give up on it,” she says.

Dr. Teri Evans-Palmer also played a big role in Jackson’s college career by supporting her and helping her find the connection between anthropology and art. “Haydyn always seemed to want to go beyond learning about techniques and skills to find out more about the artists that produced artifacts left on the earth,” says Evans-Palmer. “What cultural or social phenomenon initiated this type of imagery? What happened in the lives of these cultures, the social context, that initiated this type of work? Her investigations that led her into producing art have such an obvious scientific methodology to the process.”

There is no conflict between Jackson’s two passions. Instead, anthropological studies have given Jackson new sources of inspiration. “Anthropology informs my art,” she says. “My subject matter and ideas all stem from the way I see myself interacting with society and the way I see society interacting with me.”

There are additional benefits: “Anthropology has given me the best skills learning how to listen to people and work cooperatively,” Jackson says. Jackson is using these skills in a variety of art initiatives, such as curating exhibitions, showing her own artwork in galleries and coordinating art walks around town.

After graduation, Jackson plans on seeking a job in an art gallery and eventually continuing her studies in graduate school. One of the greatest lessons she learned at Texas State is also her best advice to others: “Follow what you love to do,” Jackson says, “and everything you need will fall into place.”

Spotlight on Excellence at Texas State: Joe McKenna

Criminal justice doctoral student honored at the White House

Photo of McKenna as he receives his award

Joe McKenna (center) contributes to the safety of students everywhere through his work at TxSSC.

By Mindy Green

It is unfortunate that safety in educational settings requires an extraordinary amount of research and preparation. Luckily for Texas State, one of the country’s most prominent research facilities on the subject is right on campus.

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Faculty: Kenneth H. Margerison

History professor rewarded for his dedication and service to teaching

By Mindy Green

Photo of Kenneth H. Margerison

Kenneth H. Margerison is the 20th Piper Professor from Texas State University.

Faculty member Kenneth H. Margerison is fascinated by the past and the way that people in earlier time periods dealt with the opportunities and problems they faced. Convinced that we have much to learn from the experiences of previous eras, he provides the opportunity for his students to gain insight and respect for history.

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Around Campus: Nature Activities and Conservation Efforts in San Marcos

Many local groups focus on enjoying, protecting the Jewel of Central Texas

By Andrew Osegi 

The natural beauty of San Marcos, Texas is one of the most compelling reasons why so many people love to visit and live here. Located on the Balcones Fault, where the Texas hill country meets the coastal plains, San Marcos is geographically primed for its natural springs and abundance of wildlife.

The San Marcos Salamander's only habitat is the San Marcos River. They are considered a threatened species.

The San Marcos salamander’s only habitat is the San Marcos River. It is considered a threatened species.

The San Marcos River, what many residents consider to be the life source of the city, starts its journey at Spring Lake, bubbling up from the underground Edwards Aquifer. The aquifer is home to many endangered and threatened species; those found in the San Marcos area include the Texas blind salamander, Texas wild rice, the fountain darter, the San Marcos gambusia, the Comal Springs riffle beetle, the Comal Springs dryopid beetle, the Peck’s cave amphipod and the San Marcos salamander. Continue reading

Happenings: Summer Camps

Wide-eyed. Wild. Wonderful.
It’s summer camp at Texas State!

Students testing D.O. in lab

Attendees test water samples in a university laboratory — one of the many hands-on science activities offered by the Aquatic Sciences Adventure Camp.

By Billi London-Gray

The bustle of San Marcos slows as the temperatures rise and thousands of Texas State University students leave the city for their hometowns. But the bustle on campus continues as hundreds of new students — from toddlers to high schoolers — flock to Texas State for summer camps.

Creativity flows at Texas State summer camps, just as pure water flows from the San Marcos springs. Inquisitive young minds gather on campus each summer to explore their passions and discover new ones with the guidance of university faculty and staff. Texas State’s unique Aquatic Sciences Adventure Camp exemplifies this experience. Continue reading

Spotlight: Flowing Waters

Partnership program brings Texas State students into local classrooms

By Mary Kincy

Flowing Waters students

Students examine slides under microscopes as part of a Flowing Waters exercise.

A partnership between Texas State and the San Marcos Consolidated Independent School District is changing the way middle- and high-school students in San Marcos schools understand science — and just in the nick of time.

Studies show students in the U.S. are lagging in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, and Flowing Waters is a hands-on program designed to engage students in the sciences, offering avenues of approach that promote interest and inspiration.

Each year, Flowing Waters places eight Texas State doctoral students in San Marcos schools, where these “resident scientists” encourage students to ask and answer their own questions using the scientific method. Continue reading