Tag Archives: student media

Around Campus: The University Star

Campus newspaper shines light, trains up-and-coming journalists

By Andrew E. Osegi 

Tucked away in the cozy Trinity Building on the Texas State University campus, dedicated students write, manage and edit their way to success through journalism.

The Trinity Building

The Trinity Building on the Texas State campus is University Star headquarters.

The University Star covers happenings and issues on the Texas State campus and in the San Marcos community. Published every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, the Star distributes approximately 8,000 copies in and around the San Marcos area to keep local citizens and students informed.

Founded in 1911, the Star’s mission since its inception has been to embody the voice of Texas State, a task that falls to the 120 student reporters, photographers, designers and members of the student editorial board who work together to produce the paper. Given the multitude of honors and awards the Star has received over the years, they accomplished their mission regularly. Continue reading

Around Campus: La Bella Vida

‘La Bella Vida’ talks beauty of
Texas State life on YouTube

By Catherine Harper

Cristina Ochoa, electronic media senior, is a former executive producer and co-host of "La Bella Vida."

For the past three years, Texas State electronic media student Cristina Ochoa says she’s been taking care of her “baby” — a student-run television show called “La Bella Vida.”

“The show has saved me and it’s been my joy,” Ochoa says. “It has a special place in my heart because it’s helped me so much as a Texas State student.”

“La Bella Vida” — which means “The Beautiful Life” in Spanish — is currently in its seventh semester on-air as a variety talk show directed toward Texas State students. The show is posted on YouTube every Wednesday night.

As a former executive producer and co-host on the show, Ochoa’s vision for the show has been to impact current and future Texas State audiences.

“We try to be the voice of Texas State,” Ochoa says. “The show appeals to the perspective of what a Texas State student would want to hear and what they do.” Continue reading