Tag Archives: Summer School Tips

Study Tips: Summer School Survival Strategies

Time: Friend or Foe?

By Texas State SLAC

Pulling all-nighters is a risky strategy for summer sessions.

Pulling all-nighters is a risky strategy for summer sessions. Photo by Sheng Han/flickr.com

It’s 1:50 in the morning. You’re at your desk, with a huge can of Monster precariously perched on a stack of books and articles. Only 456 more words to write or 19 more algebra problems to go. Our advice? Go to bed ― your mattress, bunk, futon or pull-out couch ― and sleep. You are falling victim to the commonly held idea that you work better under pressure.

Even if you do perform best late at night during the long semesters, this strategy isn’t a good one for the summer semester. Summer classes are held every day ― and on those days when you used to be sleeping after pulling an all-nighter, you’re now supposed to be in class. In the summer semester, if you procrastinate and get into the habit of working under pressure, soon you won’t have any options to do otherwise.

Summer school is intense. It is unrelenting and unforgiving. Don’t fall behind! There’ll be no time to catch up. And working too close to deadlines means not having a chance to problem solve if something goes wrong or you have last-minute trouble with a concept.

Dredge up some self-discipline to take care of your body, to make yourself read or study early in the day, to start preparing for midterms and finals, to e-mail or talk with your professor ― including the invisible professors in your online courses ― about tests and papers. Do it now.

Check TRACS and Bobcat Mail several times each day. In summer school, falling behind in sleep, your studies, or your communication is even more destructive than it is during fall or spring. Summertime is the best time to make time your friend.

Study Tips: Pros and Cons of Summer Classes

Summer classes require balancing relaxed mood with intense pace

LBJ Statue with two students in background

Summer on campus: There’s more room to walk but more need for focus.

By Texas State SLAC

It’s summer at Texas State. Parking’s closer. Traffic’s lighter. The river and its banks are less crowded. On campus, you can walk without dodging skateboards and bikes. Classrooms seem bigger — you don’t trip over backpacks as you squeeze between desks. If professors don’t mind, you can even prop up your flip-flops.

Only one problem: The seemingly relaxed pace doesn’t extend to studying for summer classes. If you don’t get your textbooks and the syllabus early, you may saunter unprepared into a lecture on two chapters — or an entire book!  Continue reading

Study Tips: Summer School Success

Summer School: How To Get Ahead
Without Losing Yours

By Texas State SLAC

Taking summer classes at Texas State has its perks. Parking is easier. Traffic is lighter. Sewell Park is less crowded. Classrooms seem bigger. Campus is calmer. In short, the living is easy.

But while the atmosphere feels a bit slower, the pace of academics is almost three times faster than during regular semesters. A summer class packs a 14-week punch into less than five weeks. If you don’t get textbooks and the syllabus early, you might saunter unprepared into a lecture covering two chapters — or worse, an entire book. Continue reading