Tag Archives: Texas State SLAC

Study Tips: Academic Checklist

Setting the tone for the semester

by Texas State SLAC

Photo by CollegeDegrees360 / flickr.com

Photo by CollegeDegrees360 / flickr.com

This is the first full week of school and a good time to set the tone for what lies ahead this semester. Consider this checklist to help you out:

____    I have purchased books and other materials for all my classes.

____    I have attended all classes for the first time and collected a syllabus for each one.

____    I have a daily planner and wall calendar on which to post all events, assignments and their due dates, exams/quizzes, trips and other extracurricular activities.

____    I have allocated time for reading each day during prime hours (8 a.m. to 5 p.m., M-F).

____    I have made a study schedule. If I do not have one, I will get someone to help me make one. A good place to start looking for help is at SLAC.

____    I have made arrangements with my employer to give me the same work schedule each week if at all possible. This will allow me to set my study hours — and not be worried about having to go to work at unexpected times and days.

____    I have shared my study schedule with my roommate so we can coordinate activities around the time we have set aside for studying.

____    I have promised myself that I will read to get ahead when I don’t have homework; moreover, I promise myself that I will never go to class having NOT read the assigned reading.

____    I will attend all labs that my courses require.

____    I promise to give myself some time to relax and have fun — and to take care of my physical and mental health. The Student Health Center and Counseling Center are on campus to assist me.

____    I will post this contract with myself where I can see it every day.

Signed: _________________________________

Date:    _________________________________

Study Tips: Summer School Survival Strategies

Time: Friend or Foe?

By Texas State SLAC

Pulling all-nighters is a risky strategy for summer sessions.

Pulling all-nighters is a risky strategy for summer sessions. Photo by Sheng Han/flickr.com

It’s 1:50 in the morning. You’re at your desk, with a huge can of Monster precariously perched on a stack of books and articles. Only 456 more words to write or 19 more algebra problems to go. Our advice? Go to bed ― your mattress, bunk, futon or pull-out couch ― and sleep. You are falling victim to the commonly held idea that you work better under pressure.

Even if you do perform best late at night during the long semesters, this strategy isn’t a good one for the summer semester. Summer classes are held every day ― and on those days when you used to be sleeping after pulling an all-nighter, you’re now supposed to be in class. In the summer semester, if you procrastinate and get into the habit of working under pressure, soon you won’t have any options to do otherwise.

Summer school is intense. It is unrelenting and unforgiving. Don’t fall behind! There’ll be no time to catch up. And working too close to deadlines means not having a chance to problem solve if something goes wrong or you have last-minute trouble with a concept.

Dredge up some self-discipline to take care of your body, to make yourself read or study early in the day, to start preparing for midterms and finals, to e-mail or talk with your professor ― including the invisible professors in your online courses ― about tests and papers. Do it now.

Check TRACS and Bobcat Mail several times each day. In summer school, falling behind in sleep, your studies, or your communication is even more destructive than it is during fall or spring. Summertime is the best time to make time your friend.

Study Tips: Reading Comprehension

Devote some time to reading every day.  (Photo by Matt Katzenberger)

Devote some time to reading every day.
(Photo by Matt Katzenberger)

Succeed In College: Read To Understand

By Texas State SLAC

Love it or hate it, you have to get familiar with academic reading in college. Your exams may include questions about readings that professors assigned but never discussed in class, so learn to read to understand. The more active your reading, the better your chance for thorough comprehension. Use a structured reading method involving forethought, performance, and reflection. Continue reading

Study Tips: Multiple-choice Exams

The decisive moment: Essential tips for taking multiple-choice exams

By Texas State SLAC

Scantron form being filled out with a pencil

Use helpful strategies for taking multiple-choice exams.

When you get your exams back, do you hear yourself say, “Why did I mark that answer?” You might want to rethink how you take multiple-choice exams. Aside from studying to master the content being tested, here’s a step-by-step process to ensure that your test-taking skills are at their best when multiple choice gets tricky. Continue reading

Study Tips: Plan Your Semester

It’s never too late to start
planning a great semester

Photo of student planner

The key to college success is good planning!

By Texas State SLAC

There’s so much pressure in getting an education: parents wanting the best for you, employers looking for top-of-the-line students, and your own expectations for excellence and success. It’s okay to want to make parents proud, find a good job, and be successful, but the grades that allow these things depend to a large extent on how you plan. Bring the following tips into your routine and seize control of your semester. Continue reading

Study Tips: Spring Finals 2012

Are you a self-saboteur? When it comes to finals, avoid pitfalls.

By Texas State SLAC

Woman studying in library

As finals approach, prepare to pace yourself.

As finals approach, it’s important to have a sound strategy for finishing each course well. You can undermine a semester’s worth of work (and a good GPA) with bad study techniques. Follow these reminders of what not to do while preparing for crucial tests and last papers. Continue reading

Study Tips: Use Your Professor

Got questions? Professors are
your best resource for answers

Professor mentoring student

Professor Tom Grimes, author of the book Mentor: A Memoir, helps a Texas State student with her work.

By Texas State SLAC

It can be difficult to converse with professors before or after class. There may be too little time because the professor may have to go to another building, or another class may be waiting outside.

That’s why professors designate office hours to meet students outside of classes. Yet many professors say few students use this time. Take advantage of their willingness to help. Your professor may be formal in class but friendly and approachable one-to-one. Continue reading

Study Tips: Plan Your Semester

Don’t let the semester get away:
Planning is the key to success

Student studying at SLACBy Texas State SLAC

There’s so much pressure in the business of getting an education: parents who want the best for you, employers who are looking for top-of-the-line students, and your own expectations for yourself and your future. Being successful when the pressure is high depends, to a large extent, on how well you plan.

The start of the semester is the perfect time to develop a strategy for meeting your educational goals over the next few months. The Texas State University Student Learning Assistance Center (SLAC) has some tips to help you plan your semester: Continue reading

Study Tips: Summer Time Management

Time: Friend or Foe?

By Texas State SLAC

It’s 1:30 a.m: You’re at your desk — a huge energy drink can precariously perched on the shortest stack of books and articles — with 456 words or 19 more algebra problems to go. Our advice? Go to bed, whether that’s a mattress, bunk or futon, and sleep. At this point your biological clock, the one that says you think better at night, is lying to you. Continue reading

Study Tips: Summer School Success

Summer School: How To Get Ahead
Without Losing Yours

By Texas State SLAC

Taking summer classes at Texas State has its perks. Parking is easier. Traffic is lighter. Sewell Park is less crowded. Classrooms seem bigger. Campus is calmer. In short, the living is easy.

But while the atmosphere feels a bit slower, the pace of academics is almost three times faster than during regular semesters. A summer class packs a 14-week punch into less than five weeks. If you don’t get textbooks and the syllabus early, you might saunter unprepared into a lecture covering two chapters — or worse, an entire book. Continue reading