Tag Archives: Texas State

Exploring Majors: Clinical Laboratory Science

What’s it like to be a Clinical Laboratory Science major?
Lindsey Coulter tells us.

By Brittnie Curtis

There are so many degrees to choose from at Texas State, some of which you may never have heard of before. If you’d like to learn more about what a clinical laboratory scientist does, watch this cool video.

Q. Your degree in Clinical Laboratory Science isn’t your first. What other degrees have you earned

Lindsey has earned three degrees at Texas State.        "It’s all about motivation. You have to be motivated; if you’re not interested, you won’t do it."

Lindsey has earned three degrees at Texas State. “It’s all about motivation. You have to be motivated; if you’re not interested, you won’t do it.”

A.  I got my bachelor’s in microbiology and then I immediately started the master’s program in biology (specifically micro-research). Immediately after that, I started the Clinical Lab Science (CLS) program. I’ve earned all of my degrees from Texas State.

Q. Why did you get all your degrees at Texas State?
A. The professors are helpful. I can walk into my professor’s office anytime and talk with them. It’s a very friendly environment, and at CLS it’s kind of like a family. We have about 20 people a year and there are five professors, so you really get to know each other. Continue reading

Study Tips: Reading Comprehension

Succeed In College: Read To Understand

By SLAC

Try not to be overwhelmed by setting a reading schedule, Bobcats!

Try not to be overwhelmed by setting a reading schedule, Bobcats!

Love it or hate it, you have to get familiar with academic reading in college. Your exams may include questions about readings that professors assigned but never discussed in class, so learn to read to understand. The more active your reading, the better your chance for thorough comprehension. Use a structured reading method involving forethoughtperformance, and reflection.

Continue reading

Around Campus: Summer Resources

Summer school survival tips

by Brittnie Curtis

Summer school has begun and campus is filled with Bobcats again. If you’re one of those students hiking around campus, you might want to know some of the resources available to you this summer.

Summer sessions are a great way to get on the fast track to graduation.

Summer sessions are a great way to get on the fast track to graduation.

Transportation Services – Twitter and Facebook
Bobcat Shuttle. Shuttle hours are different in the summer. The system is in operation during all class days. Monday – Friday service runs between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. for most shuttle routes on class days and during final exams. On the Bobcat Shuttle page, you can find the summer schedule, mapsalternative transportation and much more. Continue reading

National Student Exchange Deadline Approaching!

Broaden your horizons through exchange studies

by Lisa Chrans

Have dreams of studying in Hawaii? Maybe California? Does Puerto Rico or Canada interest you? Take courses in another state or Canada through Texas State’s domestic student exchange program, the National Student Exchange (NSE).

The NSE program gives you the opportunity to earn credit for out-of-state courses. These Bobcats went to Hawaii!

The NSE program gives you the opportunity to earn credit for out-of-state courses. These Bobcats went to Hawaii!

 

NSE allows you to take courses at an out-of-state college or university for one or two semesters and transfer them back toward your Texas State degree — all for IN-STATE TUITION!  You lose no time toward your TXST graduation plan and financial aid does apply. Read some student testimonials for a better sense of what the program can do for you.

The application due date for a Fall 2014 and/or Spring 2015 exchange is Tuesday, February 25.  You may also call 512.245.2259 or e-mail lc19 AT txstate.edu.

LBJ-MLK Crossroads Memorial

Community works together to memorialize a famous partnership

by Mindy Green

Computer image of the LBJ-MLK Crossroads Memorial

At the intersection of LBJ and MLK in San Marcos, a statue by Aaron Hussey commemorates the nation at the crossroads of equality and civil rights.

A new city landmark is about to be unveiled in San Marcos. The LBJ-MLK Crossroads Memorial,  the end-result of years of collaboration between San Marcos and Texas State University, commemorates the combined efforts of Martin Luther King Jr. and President Lyndon B. Johnson to advance the march towards equality. Continue reading

Bobcat Faces: Haydyn Jackson

December grad creatively merges diverse fields of studies

By Mindy Green

Photo of Haydyn Jackson

Jackson’s artwork is inspired by the study of culture and human interaction.

When Haydyn Jackson first enrolled at Texas State, she declared art and design as her major. As she started getting into her upper-level classes, however, she decided to pursue a different field. Jackson found herself drawn to anthropology, and eventually she switched her major. “The idea of studying culture and the way people interact and socialize seems really important,” Jackson says.

After switching majors, art was no longer Jackson’s primary focus. Her professors, however, encouraged her to continue to develop her artistic talents. She credits Ashe Laughlin, senior lecturer in the School of Art and Design for helping her decide to keep art as a minor. “He wouldn’t let me give up on it,” she says.

Dr. Teri Evans-Palmer also played a big role in Jackson’s college career by supporting her and helping her find the connection between anthropology and art. “Haydyn always seemed to want to go beyond learning about techniques and skills to find out more about the artists that produced artifacts left on the earth,” says Evans-Palmer. “What cultural or social phenomenon initiated this type of imagery? What happened in the lives of these cultures, the social context, that initiated this type of work? Her investigations that led her into producing art have such an obvious scientific methodology to the process.”

There is no conflict between Jackson’s two passions. Instead, anthropological studies have given Jackson new sources of inspiration. “Anthropology informs my art,” she says. “My subject matter and ideas all stem from the way I see myself interacting with society and the way I see society interacting with me.”

There are additional benefits: “Anthropology has given me the best skills learning how to listen to people and work cooperatively,” Jackson says. Jackson is using these skills in a variety of art initiatives, such as curating exhibitions, showing her own artwork in galleries and coordinating art walks around town.

After graduation, Jackson plans on seeking a job in an art gallery and eventually continuing her studies in graduate school. One of the greatest lessons she learned at Texas State is also her best advice to others: “Follow what you love to do,” Jackson says, “and everything you need will fall into place.”

Women in Science and Engineering Conference

“Sustainability: Preparing for the Long Haul” is the theme of Texas State’s fourth annual Women in Science and Engineering (WISE) Conference November 21 and 22.

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This event provides opportunities for students studying for careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields to gain insights into successful career practices from experienced female professionals and educators. Faculty and students interested in STEM education will benefit from workshops and posters highlighting both best practices in encouraging students to excel in the STEM disciplines and STEM research ongoing at Texas State.

The conference will feature a career panel of industry professionals and a workshop for current and future educators. Undergraduate and graduate students can participate in the research poster competition, meet and network, and apply for scholarships awarded by event sponsors.

A special program will give high school students the opportunity to meet Texas State women in STEM and to explore opportunities to further their education.

“We will have students from four high schools participating in the conference: San Marcos High, Canyon Lake High, John Paul II Catholic High School and Palacios High School,” says Dr. Dana M. Garcia, a professor in Texas State’s Department of Biology and chair of the conference planning committee.

For alumnae, the conference provides opportunities to return to campus and learn how scientists and engineers at their alma mater are advancing science and engineering practice.

For faculty and research scientists, the WISE Conference is an outstanding opportunity to learn what STEM faculty around campus are doing, identify potential collaborators, and learn about the rich scientific resources right here at Texas State.  This year’s conference will feature faculty research presentations from Texas State’s own College of Science and Engineering faculty and presentations from female engineers from Halliburton, ExxonMobil and IBM.

WISE is now accepting conference registrations, abstract submissions for the poster session and applications for tuition scholarships valued at $1,000 each. There is a pre-conference event with dinner and workshops designed to provide networking opportunities and prepare students for Friday’s conference. The pre-conference is space-limited, so register early to reserve your spot.

To register and see the conference schedule, go to wise.cose.txstate.edu