Tag Archives: Texas State

Study Tips: Reading Comprehension

Succeed In College: Read To Understand

By SLAC

Try not to be overwhelmed by setting a reading schedule, Bobcats!

Try not to be overwhelmed by setting a reading schedule, Bobcats!

Love it or hate it, you have to get familiar with academic reading in college. Your exams may include questions about readings that professors assigned but never discussed in class, so learn to read to understand. The more active your reading, the better your chance for thorough comprehension. Use a structured reading method involving forethoughtperformance, and reflection.

During the forethought phase, gather and prepare materials, and form a context for what you read before you read it. This helps you connect your thoughts to prior knowledge and builds retention:

  • Spend 5 to 10 minutes on the chapter title, topic outlines, headings, charts, diagrams and illustrations to create familiarity with content.
  • Read the chapter summary twice; think of what you already know about the topic.
  • Ask yourself what question the chapter is answering.
  • Determine how much energy to put into reading based on earlier study and knowledge.
  • Use the Internet if necessary to create another framework in which to put what you read.

Use the performance phase to actively read:

  • Focus attention by following the text with your index finger, a pen or pencil, and a note card with colored edges to keep you on the correct line.
  • Divide the chapter into parts; use a timer and short breaks to question yourself about the material.
  • Read and then mark or highlight primary points and write notes in the margin.
  • Explain to yourself (aloud) what you understand; hearing yourself increases retention.
  • Use headings to formulate questions in the margins and to prep for exams; ask yourself what the primary ideas are in each section.
  • Reread confusing sections and get help from learning centers and classmates if you need it.

Give yourself a reflection phase to review and understand:

  • Review the day of your first read-through to increase retention, and review each day until the exam.
  • Use chapter review cards, mapping, study guides and test preps to organize thoughts.
  • Explain aloud what you’ve understood to others; teaching leads to understanding.
  • Continue building a context from what you know — and connect the text to your class notes. Write the text’s page numbers beside corresponding in-class notes.

Other types of college texts require different reading strategies. Problem-centered texts require that you read and work problems; selected readings require you to use introductions and notes from class lectures; literature requires you to read after gaining a context for the work from prior knowledge or the Internet; research articles require you to read abstracts before starting; and reference works require you to preview structure, use tabs to mark key points, and note other textual facets.

Watch for two common stumbling blocks: an inadequate college-level vocabulary and poor concentration. Electronic or paper vocabulary cards can help tackle the former, as can learning Greek and Latin roots, prefixes and suffixes. Build your concentration by reading through a chapter in smaller increments in a setting that puts demands on your space and time.

Remember that your primary goal for reading is to understand, not simply memorize. You are building a structure upon which your future depends, so make it sturdy.

Source: Adapted from Sellers, D., Dochen, C., & Hodges, R. (In press). Academic Transformation: the Road to College Success. Boston: Pearson.

Around Campus: Summer Resources

Summer school survival tips

by Brittnie Curtis

Summer school has begun and campus is filled with Bobcats again. If you’re one of those students hiking around campus, you might want to know some of the resources available to you this summer.

Summer sessions are a great way to get on the fast track to graduation.

Summer sessions are a great way to get on the fast track to graduation.

Transportation Services - Twitter and Facebook
Bobcat Shuttle. Shuttle hours are different in the summer. The system is in operation during all class days. Monday – Friday service runs between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. for most shuttle routes on class days and during final exams. On the Bobcat Shuttle page, you can find the summer schedule, mapsalternative transportation and much more.

Parking Services - Permit are  available for purchase and are valid until August 15, 2014. Take a look at the parking map before coming to campus to make sure you know where your permit allows you to park. Give Parking Services a call at 512.245.2887 if you have more questions.

Dine On Campus
Summer I meal trades have started and the summer hours for dining halls have been posted. If you don’t have a meal plan yet, don’t worry! All prices can be found online and are fairly easy to purchase. You can also keep up with them on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram for tips on diets, food nutrition and healthy living.

Alkek Library - Twitter and Facebook
The library will be filled with students again studying for summer session I. Make sure you know when the library hours are!

Student Health Center - Twitter and Facebook 
Did you know that you can make appointments with the Student Health Center during the summer? Students who graduated in the spring can also still take advantage of the resources the Student Health Center has to offer. On the health center webpage, you can find the hours that they’re open, the clinical services that they provide and vaccination information.

Campus Recreation - Twitter and Facebook
You’d be surprised at the amount of services that Campus Recreation has to offer over the summer. The list seriously goes on and on. One of the main places students might be interested during the summer is the Student Recreation Center, where you’ll find group exercises, the Rock Wall and an indoor pool.

Texas State MobileAndroid and Apple 
A lot of the information in this post can be found at one central location — the Texas State Mobile App! It really is a lifesaver. From bus schedule and library hours, to news updates and your class schedule, the app has it all. It’s a great way to access information quickly and efficiently.

All in all, there’s a lot you need to know going into the summer school sessions. We’ve tried to provide you with quick shortcuts to most of that information. If we’ve missed anything, you can tweet us and we’ll try our best to point you in the right direction.

Have a great summer, Bobcats!

National Student Exchange Deadline Approaching!

Broaden your horizons through exchange studies

by Lisa Chrans

Have dreams of studying in Hawaii? Maybe California? Does Puerto Rico or Canada interest you? Take courses in another state or Canada through Texas State’s domestic student exchange program, the National Student Exchange (NSE).

The NSE program gives you the opportunity to earn credit for out-of-state courses. These Bobcats went to Hawaii!

The NSE program gives you the opportunity to earn credit for out-of-state courses. These Bobcats went to Hawaii!

 

NSE allows you to take courses at an out-of-state college or university for one or two semesters and transfer them back toward your Texas State degree — all for IN-STATE TUITION!  You lose no time toward your TXST graduation plan and financial aid does apply. Read some student testimonials for a better sense of what the program can do for you.

The application due date for a Fall 2014 and/or Spring 2015 exchange is Tuesday, February 25.  You may also call 512.245.2259 or e-mail lc19 AT txstate.edu.

LBJ-MLK Crossroads Memorial

Community works together to memorialize a famous partnership

by Mindy Green

Computer image of the LBJ-MLK Crossroads Memorial

At the intersection of LBJ and MLK in San Marcos, a statue by Aaron Hussey commemorates the nation at the crossroads of equality and civil rights.

A new city landmark is about to be unveiled in San Marcos. The LBJ-MLK Crossroads Memorial,  the end-result of years of collaboration between San Marcos and Texas State University, commemorates the combined efforts of Martin Luther King Jr. and President Lyndon B. Johnson to advance the march towards equality. Continue reading

Bobcat Faces: Haydyn Jackson

December grad creatively merges diverse fields of studies

By Mindy Green

Photo of Haydyn Jackson

Jackson’s artwork is inspired by the study of culture and human interaction.

When Haydyn Jackson first enrolled at Texas State, she declared art and design as her major. As she started getting into her upper-level classes, however, she decided to pursue a different field. Jackson found herself drawn to anthropology, and eventually she switched her major. “The idea of studying culture and the way people interact and socialize seems really important,” Jackson says.

After switching majors, art was no longer Jackson’s primary focus. Her professors, however, encouraged her to continue to develop her artistic talents. She credits Ashe Laughlin, senior lecturer in the School of Art and Design for helping her decide to keep art as a minor. “He wouldn’t let me give up on it,” she says.

Dr. Teri Evans-Palmer also played a big role in Jackson’s college career by supporting her and helping her find the connection between anthropology and art. “Haydyn always seemed to want to go beyond learning about techniques and skills to find out more about the artists that produced artifacts left on the earth,” says Evans-Palmer. “What cultural or social phenomenon initiated this type of imagery? What happened in the lives of these cultures, the social context, that initiated this type of work? Her investigations that led her into producing art have such an obvious scientific methodology to the process.”

There is no conflict between Jackson’s two passions. Instead, anthropological studies have given Jackson new sources of inspiration. “Anthropology informs my art,” she says. “My subject matter and ideas all stem from the way I see myself interacting with society and the way I see society interacting with me.”

There are additional benefits: “Anthropology has given me the best skills learning how to listen to people and work cooperatively,” Jackson says. Jackson is using these skills in a variety of art initiatives, such as curating exhibitions, showing her own artwork in galleries and coordinating art walks around town.

After graduation, Jackson plans on seeking a job in an art gallery and eventually continuing her studies in graduate school. One of the greatest lessons she learned at Texas State is also her best advice to others: “Follow what you love to do,” Jackson says, “and everything you need will fall into place.”

Women in Science and Engineering Conference

“Sustainability: Preparing for the Long Haul” is the theme of Texas State’s fourth annual Women in Science and Engineering (WISE) Conference November 21 and 22.

Image

This event provides opportunities for students studying for careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields to gain insights into successful career practices from experienced female professionals and educators. Faculty and students interested in STEM education will benefit from workshops and posters highlighting both best practices in encouraging students to excel in the STEM disciplines and STEM research ongoing at Texas State.

The conference will feature a career panel of industry professionals and a workshop for current and future educators. Undergraduate and graduate students can participate in the research poster competition, meet and network, and apply for scholarships awarded by event sponsors.

A special program will give high school students the opportunity to meet Texas State women in STEM and to explore opportunities to further their education.

“We will have students from four high schools participating in the conference: San Marcos High, Canyon Lake High, John Paul II Catholic High School and Palacios High School,” says Dr. Dana M. Garcia, a professor in Texas State’s Department of Biology and chair of the conference planning committee.

For alumnae, the conference provides opportunities to return to campus and learn how scientists and engineers at their alma mater are advancing science and engineering practice.

For faculty and research scientists, the WISE Conference is an outstanding opportunity to learn what STEM faculty around campus are doing, identify potential collaborators, and learn about the rich scientific resources right here at Texas State.  This year’s conference will feature faculty research presentations from Texas State’s own College of Science and Engineering faculty and presentations from female engineers from Halliburton, ExxonMobil and IBM.

WISE is now accepting conference registrations, abstract submissions for the poster session and applications for tuition scholarships valued at $1,000 each. There is a pre-conference event with dinner and workshops designed to provide networking opportunities and prepare students for Friday’s conference. The pre-conference is space-limited, so register early to reserve your spot.

To register and see the conference schedule, go to wise.cose.txstate.edu

Study Tips: Pros and Cons of Summer Classes

Summer classes require balancing relaxed mood with intense pace

LBJ Statue with two students in background

Summer on campus: There’s more room to walk but more need for focus.

By Texas State SLAC

It’s summer at Texas State. Parking’s closer. Traffic’s lighter. The river and its banks are less crowded. On campus, you can walk without dodging skateboards and bikes. Classrooms seem bigger — you don’t trip over backpacks as you squeeze between desks. If professors don’t mind, you can even prop up your flip-flops.

Only one problem: The seemingly relaxed pace doesn’t extend to studying for summer classes. If you don’t get your textbooks and the syllabus early, you may saunter unprepared into a lecture on two chapters — or an entire book!  Continue reading

Happenings: Cat Camp

Cat Camp gives new students an inside track to Texas State life

By Mindy Green

Group picture of all of the Cat Camp Counselors

2013 Cat Camp Counselors

Instead of fearing the unknown about coming to college, freshmen can become acquainted with their peers and get ahead of the game when it comes to learning about being a Bobcat. Cat Camp, a two-day retreat offered every year, is Texas State University’s only spirit, pride and traditions summer camp.  Continue reading

Alumni: Krystle Moore

Fearless learner: Asking questions opened doors to scholarships, mentors, career path for biology grad

studio portrait of Krystle Moore

Krystle Moore ’13

By Billi London-Gray

It’s hard to believe brilliant people who tell you, “Don’t be afraid to feel dumb.” But these words are the motto of Krystle Moore, who recently completed her bachelor’s degree in biology at Texas State University. Her brave, inquisitive attitude has led her to one great opportunity after another. Continue reading

Happenings: VATS Golf Tournament

Veterans Alliance at Texas State to host golf benefit for local VFW

logo for Veterans Alliance

Veterans Alliance at Texas State (VATS) is a chartered student organization that supports student-veterans.

By Billi London-Gray

The Veterans Alliance at Texas State (VATS) is sponsoring its third annual golf tournament on Friday, April 19, at Quail Creek Country Club in San Marcos. Proceeds from the tournament will benefit the Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) Post 3413, located in San Marcos.

“The VFW has a long history of supporting the surrounding community and providing veterans with a voice in local, state and national government,” says Jeremy Casselberry, a Navy veteran and president of VATS. Continue reading