Category Archives: Students

Students: 5 Tips to Prepare for the Future

By SLAC

“While I take inspiration from the past, like most Americans, I live for the future.”  — Ronald Reagan

Take a coffee break and start thinking about what your next step is, Bobcats.

Take a coffee break and start thinking about what your next step is, Bobcats.

So many times we are reminded to live in the present, but we still need to prepare for the future. And if you are reading this, you have a future. Whether you are a freshman or a senior, listen well: it’s never too early or late to have a game plan. In “Advice for Students: Start Planning Now for Life After College,” Dustin Max tells students not to view college as a break from real life but to start seeing it as a stage of real life. Here’s how:

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Around Campus: Nontraditional Student Shares Her Experiences

By Brittnie Curtis

The National Center for Education Statistics reports that some 18 million students were enrolled in undergraduate programs during Fall 2014. Of that amount, 71 percent of them attend four-year colleges (source). Texas State University’s student enrollment for Fall 2014 was 36,739 and nontraditional students made up around 22 percent of the student body (source).

Ellen Crabaugh is a part of that 22 percent. After graduating high school, Crabaugh focused on her family and work. During that time, she was able to complete an associate degree in American Sign Language at the Los Angeles Pierce College after 10 years of hard work.

Crabaugh moved to Wimberley and took a job at Texas State University as an American Sign Language interpreter. That’s when she decided to continue her education by pursuing a bachelor’s degree in English.

We were able to sit down with Crabaugh and ask her a few questions.

Q.Why did you decide to study at Texas State?

A. I had been trying to get a bachelor’s degree for a long time, and I figured why not? I love the campus, and the more I worked in classrooms with professors, the more I started to think about which professors I would take. I ended up taking a lot of the professors I had worked with here.

Q. How welcoming do you think the campus is to nontraditional students?

A. I have never had a problem. All the students and professors have been great. A lot of the professors I’ve gotten to know better because we’re around the same age. The students seem to watch their language when I’m in the groups. Some will confide in me because I look like their mother. They feel safe because they don’t have to compete with me. I will say that no one’s ever been rude to me. I do get asked if I’m the teacher, but that’s about it.

Q. What are some of the challenges you face in comparison to a traditional student?

A. I think in some ways I have it easier than a traditional student because I don’t have anything to prove, I’m not looking to climb a social ladder, and I’m not being called to go party somewhere or go to the beach. I have specific responsibilities, which makes it more difficult but at the same time makes it easier. I think there’s a balancing act on both sides. Traditional students have it easier because they might not have children and house payments, but I don’t have the peer pressure they all have.

Q. How do you manage scheduling school and studying into your daily life?

A. I’m in all of my upper division English classes, so there’s usually lot of writing, and I also work 30 plus hours a week. What I’ve done is schedule my classes around my work schedule. I have classes Tuesday and Thursday and work long shifts Monday and Wednesday. So I have Tuesday afternoon to do homework that’s due on Thursday, and then I have Thursday morning to do what homework I may not have finished before I go to class again. Then I have Saturday and Sunday to do the homework that’s due Tuesday.

Q. What changes do you see after getting your bachelor’s degree?

A. Getting my college degree was mainly for my own edification. My dad, who was 40 years old when he earned his degree, instilled that in me at a young age. As a sign language interpreter, the better I know my native language the better I am at interpreting. If it leads to something else, that’s great; if not, I love what I do.

Q. Do you have any advice for people interested in getting their college degree later on in life?

A. Keep going. It’s easy to want to quit. Don’t stop until you get there. You can still do it. You’re never too old. Just keep doing it. It’s worth it, and the classes are fun. Learning is fun.

 

If Crabaugh keeps her current pace of two classes per semester, she’ll complete her degree in two more years.

Texas State offers lots of support for nontraditional students, including the Non-Traditional Student Organization, which offers tutoring, scholarships and fun events.

Students: Spring Break Tips

By SLAC

 

Spring Break is here at last. Unfortunately, semesters don’t always end when a college student’s vacation begins. Learning to keep up with academic work while enjoying your time off is an essential skill for college life and beyond!

Make a plan. Since your brain is still in college mode, take advantage of it. Put what you have to get done and related deadlines on a calendar. Make a schedule to be sure you study some each day and more on days you aren’t actively involved in extracurricular fun. Creating a plan now will prevent stress later and keep you from completely losing the rhythm of academic life.  Continue reading

Students: Organize Your Academic World

By SLAC

iStock_000001949041SmallJust as your room and even your car can indicate your emotional state, so can your notes and books show your academic state of mind. Piles of scribbled-on Post-its, incoherent notes, and randomly highlighted books are all displays of your hectic, stress-filled, and often ineffective academic life.

As the semester continues, take time to organize your notes and school materials. In so doing, you can alleviate stress and have a much more successful learning experience!

  • Whether you use loose-leaf-filled binders or spiral notebooks, remember to date your notes. The dates will not only help you see the cause-and-effect relations between the material you are covering, but also they’ll prove to be priceless should you miss a class and need to get notes from a classmate.
  • Along these lines, exchange contact information with a classmate or two.
  • Use the margins in your notes and books to jot questions that might be on the test, questions you have or to write page numbers of textbook material that correlate to your notes.
  • Remember that most textbooks have indexes. If you have a topic on which your notes are sketchy, you can look it up in your textbook and take notes from it and/or highlight that portion of the text.
  • Purchase a planner/agenda and put important due dates from your syllabus in it. Add information to the planner as the instructor assigns more tasks during the semester.
  • Record dates for major assignments or tests several weeks in advance. Then you can begin your work ahead of time and avoid the stress of procrastinating on an assignment or pulling an all-nighter studying for a test.
  • Buy a calendar and put it on the wall where you’ll be forced to see it. This is a great way to remind yourself of important dates/deadlines daily.
  • Use the calendar feature on your phone to record important test dates and other academic events.
  • Consider using different-colored ink or paper for your courses to better organize your classwork.

As always, when in doubt about what you’ve written or how you’ve got a series of events or problems ordered, ask your professors for help during office hours or e-mail them. Remember, staying organized in your academic life can lead to academic and personal success!

 

Students: Professors as a Resource

by Texas State SLAC

Senior professor discusses an issue with a student

It can be difficult to converse with professors before or after class. There may be too little time because the professor may have to go to another building, or another class may be waiting outside. That’s why professors designate office hours to meet students outside of classes. Yet many professors say few students use this time. Take advantage of their willingness to help. Your professor may be formal in class yet friendly and approachable one-to-one. Continue reading

Study Tips: Getting Back on Track in Spring

Ten helpful tips that guarantee a successful spring semester

by Texas State SLAC

Photo of a student getting tutoring help

1. Reconnect with other students.

Seek out students from the previous semester’s classes, organizations, living arrangements and work. Building upon acquaintances can lead you to form study partners and future friendships. Plus, being socially involved gives balance to a stressful life. And don’t hesitate to talk first to those you recognize on campus. It is easier to speak the first time you see someone than the next.

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Students: Preparing for Spring 2015

By Brittnie Curtis

It’s getting closer and closer. January 20 will be here before we know it. Before school starts, familiarize yourself with a few things going on around campus. Here is some important information for the spring semester.

Spring 2015 Dining Hours

Spring 2015 Dining Hours

DINE ON CAMPUS

All dining locations on campus will be open on the first day of classes. On the Texas State dining websiteyou’ll find a schedule of the locations on campus that are currently open and a spring 2015  hours of operations schedule. There’s also a map of all the dining locations on campus.

Meal plans will be active on January 14 and can be purchased throughout the year. App on Campus, from Google Play Store or iTunes Store, has all of this information and much more. You can access it in the Texas State Mobile app under the campus resources tab or simply download the app itself. Keep up with dining services on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. Continue reading