Tag Archives: Alkek Library

Happenings: Library Turns 25

Alkek Library Celebrates 25th Year

by Julia Sloan

Our Albert B. Alkek Library, named for an influential oilman and philanthropist, was founded in 1990. Previously, the J. C. Kellam Building housed our books and resources. To symbolically mark the official move to the new library, which opened on May 1, 1990, a long line of students, faculty and staff formed a “Book-It Brigade” to transfer four books from JCK to Alkek: La relacion y comentarios del governado Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca from the Southwestern Writers Collection, Selections from the Poems of Robert Burns, the aptly titled Move! and The Color Purple by Alice Walker.

New column-wraps on Alkek celebrate the building's 25 years.

Column wraps on Alkek celebrate the building’s first 25 years.

Members of the Texas State community are invited to join a reenactment of this event on September 23 at 10 a.m. The line will start at Old Main, where the very first Texas State library was, and end at the top of the Alkek Library staircase. Some of the people who were involved in the original Book-it Brigade are still a part of the Alkek family, working and serving our library as it celebrates 25 years on the Texas State campus.

Library Associate Vice President Joan Heath is excited about the many events that will mark the building’s first quarter-century. “The whole point of this celebration is to share it with the whole campus community,” she says. These 25 years bring the past and the present of Texas State population together, giving “the students back then and the students of today something in common, 25 years apart,” says Heath.

As technology advances, more and more students are turning to online resources for completing class assignments. The Alkek Library serves both as a physical library and a virtual one, offering books to check out and online databases for extended research. Despite the changes that have taken place over the past 25 years, Heath says, “People still need the physical library. It feels great to walk out on the main floor and see it so busy. To me, that’s a message. That says we’re doing something to meet the needs of students.”

Many celebrations are happening this semester. Join in the party! Learn about all the planned events at txstate.edu/library.

Preparing for Thanksgiving



Spending time in the library each week now could help you in the long run!

The days are getting shorter as your to-do list is getting longer. You might be tempted to put some class work off until after Thanksgiving because you don’t want to be doing homework, writing papers, working on projects or studying for tests while you are around family and friends, eating turkey and then sleeping off the L-tryptophan! But by putting off course assignments, you could find yourself neck-deep in work—and facing lowered motivation because the semester will be almost over. Plus you’ll have finals to study for! Here is a better course of action: Continue reading

Study Tips: Summer Session Survival

The Upside of Summer Session


Check out SLAC for tutoring in a wide variety of subjects.

Check out SLAC for tutoring in a wide variety of subjects.

Ah, summer school! Parking is closer and traffic is lighter. You can turn left without a car bearing down on you or a bicyclist whizzing past. The river and its banks are less crowded. You can park on Town Square! You can walk on campus without dodging skateboards. Classrooms seem bigger. You don’t trip over backpacks as you squeeze between desks, and if professors don’t mind, you can prop up your flip-flops.

There’s only one problem: If you don’t get textbooks and syllabi early so that you can read any material your instructors might have assigned for the first day, you could saunter into a lecture unprepared. When possible, get your first week of reading done before classes even begin. Expect papers each week (or two), tests on Mondays, and homework every night, because you have only four and a half weeks to cover 13–14 weeks of course material.

But intensity has its benefits. You’ll be working with focused students broader in age range and experiences; some will be returning professionals honing skills or redirecting careers. As a result, in-class discussion can be more interesting and study groups can draw from the variety of students’ experiences, so use each other’s strengths. Also, motivated students in small classes can make your professors even more involved and accessible.

Of course, campus study and recreation resources are still available: The Student Learning Assistance Center (SLAC), the Writing Center, Math Lab and many other tutoring labs will be open during the summer sessions. In addition, the Alkek Library, LBJ Student Student Center and Rec Center are not only open, but they probably are far less crowded than during the fall and spring semesters.

Summer school equals work but it’s also a great introduction or a refreshing return to one of college’s best experiences!


Around Campus: Summer Resources

Summer school survival tips

by Brittnie Curtis

Summer school has begun and campus is filled with Bobcats again. If you’re one of those students hiking around campus, you might want to know some of the resources available to you this summer.

Summer sessions are a great way to get on the fast track to graduation.

Summer sessions are a great way to get on the fast track to graduation.

Transportation Services – Twitter and Facebook
Bobcat Shuttle. Shuttle hours are different in the summer. The system is in operation during all class days. Monday – Friday service runs between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. for most shuttle routes on class days and during final exams. On the Bobcat Shuttle page, you can find the summer schedule, mapsalternative transportation and much more. Continue reading

Study Tips: Pros and Cons of Summer Classes

Summer classes require balancing relaxed mood with intense pace

LBJ Statue with two students in background

Summer on campus: There’s more room to walk but more need for focus.

By Texas State SLAC

It’s summer at Texas State. Parking’s closer. Traffic’s lighter. The river and its banks are less crowded. On campus, you can walk without dodging skateboards and bikes. Classrooms seem bigger — you don’t trip over backpacks as you squeeze between desks. If professors don’t mind, you can even prop up your flip-flops.

Only one problem: The seemingly relaxed pace doesn’t extend to studying for summer classes. If you don’t get your textbooks and the syllabus early, you may saunter unprepared into a lecture on two chapters — or an entire book!  Continue reading

Study Tips: Mobile Research Apps

Take your research mobile!

By Lisa Ancelet, Head Reference Services Librarian

Research apps

Mobile apps help you research on the go.

Do you often find yourself conducting research on your mobile device or wishing you could? Alkek Library at Texas State University offers students, faculty and staff many different options to make mobile research not only possible, but easy. Continue reading

Around Campus: Essential Tips

Being a Bobcat: Essential Tips for a GREAT Texas State Experience

The Rising Star of Texas

By Andrew Osegi

To the incoming freshman, the transfer student, the misinformed undergrad or the curious prospect, Texas State University can be a maze of hills, stairs, majors and student orgs. To help you navigate that maze, you need some essential insider knowledge.

With input from a few fellow students, I’ve compiled the following tips to help you make the most of your Texas State experience. These secrets can greatly impact your time at Texas State. Remember them, and you’ll do just fine. Continue reading