Tag Archives: Department of Anthropology

Texas State Voices: Andrew Osegi

Looking back: Three unforgettable years at Texas State University

Once on campus, I hoped to take advantage of my time as an undergraduate.

Andrew Osegi, Class of 2013

By Andrew Osegi

As I look back on my three years at Texas State University — I’m about to graduate with my bachelor’s degree in journalism on May 11 — an eruption of mixed feelings floods my memory.

I feel excitement when I recall my first day on campus as a freshman. Fresh out of high school from McAllen, Texas, attending Texas State was the next big step in my life. While traversing the steps of the beautiful, foreign campus, the promise of adventure kept me eager for new experiences. As I became a seasoned Bobcat, my expectations to meet new people, explore new ideas and grow as a person were consistently met.

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Spotlight: Dr. Michael Collins

Collins’ lifelong work honored
by Texas Archeological Society

Collins with dig site in background

Dr. Michael Collins, pictured at the Gault site.

By Ann Friou

Dr. Michael B. Collins, research professor in anthropology at Texas State University, has received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Texas Archeological Society (TAS). The TAS, which promotes the study, preservation and awareness of Texas archaeology, presented the award to Collins on Oct. 29.

Collins co-directs the world-renowned Gault archaeological site in Central Texas, where recent discoveries have changed most archaeologists’ thinking about America’s earliest inhabitants. Continue reading

Alumni: Chris Perez

Perez takes music industry track to local stage with Friends of Fine Arts

Photo of Chris Perez

Chris Perez, class of '89, is a board member for Texas State's Friends of Fine Arts.

By Catherine Harper

In the music business, striking a chord between who you know and industry experience is ideal. For Chris Perez, Texas State graduate and president and CEO of Captiva Music Group, achieving that ideal harmony means sharing the music with Texas State. He’ll use his international experience and industry connections to play a part behind-the-scenes as a board member for Texas State’s Friends of Fine Arts, a support organization for the College of Fine Arts and Communication.

Perez, a first-generation college student, graduated from Texas State in 1989 with a degree in anthropology and international studies. He started his career as a grant and community development specialist in municipal government, working for several years around the state in Austin, Harlingen and San Marcos. However, with determination and some spontaneity his path veered in pursuit of his top passion: music.

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Rising Stars: Michael Collins

Texas State archaeology professor
brings ancient culture to life


Michael Collins came of age during a period Texas author Elmer Kelton referred to as “the time it never rained.”

One of the worst droughts on record gripped much of the United States, including Collins’ hometown of Midland, in the 1950s. Lakes dried up. Unceasing heat desiccated the soil. Agricultural activity slowed to a crawl.

The West Texas winds did not slow down. They stole the dirt, carrying it by the ton for hundreds of miles in swirling, choking clouds. Collins remembers a horseman riding under a barbed-wire fence — and not being able to touch the bottom strand.

But while the drought and the winds were stealing topsoil from West Texas, they were giving Mike Collins a gift: archaeology. Continue reading

Around Campus: Training the FBI

FBI agents learn the secrets of fingerprint recovery at Texas State

The Forensic Anthropology Center at Texas State University-San Marcos trains FBI agents from around the country in the science of identifying human remains. The center is home to one of the top forensics programs in the world.

The FBI agents being trained at Texas State are part of a specialized Evidence Response Team or ERT. They assist in major crimes investigations and disaster responses all over the world. Recovering fingerprints is crucial element in the process of identifying human remains.

“Anytime they have to recover fingerprints in difficult situations, this is the team that does it,” said Forensic Anthropology Center Director, Dr. Michelle Hamilton, in an interview with KVUE News. “This research is really important because we give identity to people who are unknown.”

Watch the full report on kvue.com.

Spotlight: Glenda Jurek-Rahe

Advisor awarded for outstanding work with students, as student

By Billi London-Gray

Glenda Jurek-Rahe, an advisor in the College of Liberal Arts at Texas State University, works hard to help students. Herself an alumna and a grad student at Texas State, she knows how to make the most of a college education. Recently, her peers recognized her exceptional skills as a student and an advisor by awarding her the Texas Academic Advising Network Scholarship. Continue reading

Alumni: Kirk French

Anthropology graduate to co-host
program on Discovery Channel

Kirk French

Kirk French, who graduated from Texas State in 1998 with a degree in anthropology, will be unearthing American treasures this spring on the Discovery Channel.

French, who went on to earn his doctorate in archaeology from Penn State University and land a job on the faculty there, will be the co-host of a new show, American Treasures, on the cable channel beginning Tuesday. Continue reading

Texas State Faces: Christina Conlee

Texas State professor, archaeologist
talks about work in South America

Christina Conlee was one of the featured experts in a recent National Geographic television documentary, talking about her research into the ancient Nasca people of Peru. Her work has helped break new ground in the study of the people who created the mysterious Nasca Lines and lived in one of the world’s most arid places.

Rising Stars: Christina Conlee

Archaeologist featured
on Texas State homepage

Christina Conlee


The latest addition to the “Rising Stars” series of profiles on the Texas State homepage is Christina Conlee, who has been doing groundbreaking work researching the ancient Nasca people of Peru.

Conlee, who teaches archaeology in the Texas State Department of Anthropology, took part in the production of a documentary about the mysterious Nasca Lines for the National Geographic channel.

Click here for more information about the documentary

Click here to see the Texas State homepage story and video about Conlee