Tag Archives: Texas State University

Around Campus: Business Leadership Week

Helping the Texas State community get the edge on success

By Brittnie Curtis

For the past six years, the McCoy College of Business Administration at Texas State University has hosted Business Leadership Week (BLW). Anchored around the Texas State Leadership Institute Annual Conference, BLW is a four-day event that gives attendees the opportunity to engage in meaningful discussions about the Common Experience theme and how it applies to the business and professional world.

Brittany Christman, McCoy College advisor and student development coordinator, along with the rest of the academic advising staff, have spent the past two semesters setting the framework for the upcoming BLW. With the help of distinguished speakers, campus organizations and sponsors, this signature event has grown significantly over the past years.  Continue reading

Students: Preparing for Spring 2015

By Brittnie Curtis

It’s getting closer and closer. January 20 will be here before we know it. Before school starts, familiarize yourself with a few things going on around campus. Here is some important information for the spring semester.

Spring 2015 Dining Hours

Spring 2015 Dining Hours

DINE ON CAMPUS

All dining locations on campus will be open on the first day of classes. On the Texas State dining websiteyou’ll find a schedule of the locations on campus that are currently open and a spring 2015  hours of operations schedule. There’s also a map of all the dining locations on campus.

Meal plans will be active on January 14 and can be purchased throughout the year. App on Campus, from Google Play Store or iTunes Store, has all of this information and much more. You can access it in the Texas State Mobile app under the campus resources tab or simply download the app itself. Keep up with dining services on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. Continue reading

Preparing for Thanksgiving

by SLAC

Alkek

Spending time in the library each week now could help you in the long run!

The days are getting shorter as your to-do list is getting longer. You might be tempted to put some class work off until after Thanksgiving because you don’t want to be doing homework, writing papers, working on projects or studying for tests while you are around family and friends, eating turkey and then sleeping off the L-tryptophan! But by putting off course assignments, you could find yourself neck-deep in work—and facing lowered motivation because the semester will be almost over. Plus you’ll have finals to study for! Here is a better course of action: Continue reading

Study Tips: Summer Session Survival

The Upside of Summer Session

by SLAC

Check out SLAC for tutoring in a wide variety of subjects.

Check out SLAC for tutoring in a wide variety of subjects.

Ah, summer school! Parking is closer and traffic is lighter. You can turn left without a car bearing down on you or a bicyclist whizzing past. The river and its banks are less crowded. You can park on Town Square! You can walk on campus without dodging skateboards. Classrooms seem bigger. You don’t trip over backpacks as you squeeze between desks, and if professors don’t mind, you can prop up your flip-flops.

There’s only one problem: If you don’t get textbooks and syllabi early so that you can read any material your instructors might have assigned for the first day, you could saunter into a lecture unprepared. When possible, get your first week of reading done before classes even begin. Expect papers each week (or two), tests on Mondays, and homework every night, because you have only four and a half weeks to cover 13–14 weeks of course material.

But intensity has its benefits. You’ll be working with focused students broader in age range and experiences; some will be returning professionals honing skills or redirecting careers. As a result, in-class discussion can be more interesting and study groups can draw from the variety of students’ experiences, so use each other’s strengths. Also, motivated students in small classes can make your professors even more involved and accessible.

Of course, campus study and recreation resources are still available: The Student Learning Assistance Center (SLAC), the Writing Center, Math Lab and many other tutoring labs will be open during the summer sessions. In addition, the Alkek Library, LBJ Student Student Center and Rec Center are not only open, but they probably are far less crowded than during the fall and spring semesters.

Summer school equals work but it’s also a great introduction or a refreshing return to one of college’s best experiences!

 

Exploring Majors: Agriculture

What’s it like to be an agriculture major? Dorothy Bell tells us.

By Brittnie Curtis

Being an outstanding student takes focus and motivation.

Being an outstanding student takes focus and motivation.

Q: What fueled your interest to major in animal science?
A.
I grew up with a golden retriever that was the same age as me. When I was younger, I started volunteering with animals at the rescue organizations that you often see outside of pet stores. I’ve loved animals my entire life and have always wanted to help them. Continue reading

Rising Stars – SioTeX™ Team

Texas State team advances to ACS GCI Business Plan Competition

SioTeX has a 1-in-5 chance of taking top honors! Show this green company your support.

by Brittnie Curtis and Mary-Love Bigony

Four Texas State graduate students and one recent Ph.D graduate left Houston in April with a $125,000 prize from the Texas HALO Fund. When they arrived back in San Marcos, they were ready to build their business.

Continue reading

Student Life: The Job Hunt

Bobcats find job-search assistance through Career Services

By Brittnie Curtis

Finding a job is easier with the help of Career Services.

Finding a job is easier with the help of Career Services.

The spring semester is finally over. Some students will be soaking up the sun this summer at Sewell Park, but others may want to find a job. Now is a good time to do that. With students graduating, traveling and going home, many employers need to hire new staff to fill newly empty positions. Continue reading